Topic

Obama

Trump does Miami

Trump does Miami

The majority of Cubans in Miami no longer support a hardline policy toward Cuba, which is probably why Trump didn’t reinstate the whole Cuba package of the Bush years. But, as long as the Diaz-Balarts of this city and their ilk continue to bellow from seats of power, Miami will still be a zoo.

On the issue of the interests of the Cuban people

On the issue of the interests of the Cuban people

It is possible that the administrations in the U.S. and Cuba made a strategic mistake during the two-year window after the announcement of December 2014. Both parties assumed, with excessive certainty and speed, that they would have at least four more years to smooth things over and build mutual trust.

It’s all about the 2018 midterm elections

It’s all about the 2018 midterm elections

A politician’s magic touch is knowing where and how to touch the citizens’ fiber, or an important part of it. Such is the case of former President Obama and the health-care system he instituted, known as Obamacare. For his part, President Trump also knows that the 2018 elections could change the correlation of forces on Capitol Hill.

Faint praise for Barack Obama’s embrace of wealth

Faint praise for Barack Obama’s embrace of wealth

In 2009, President Obama said, “I did not run for office to be helping out a bunch of fat cat bankers on Wall Street,” although he managed to do as much. Obama’s campaign included the notion that Wall Street fat cats should pay their fair share in taxes. That hasn’t happened, but at least some of those cats are paying a fair share to him.

America takes a giant leap backward, 140 characters at a time

America takes a giant leap backward, 140 characters at a time

He is not a man of eloquence. His life appears limited to 140 characters at a time, which includes carefully studied sound bites. His choppy discourse often evokes a vulgar American exceptionalism, and he sprinkles it with downright lies. Still, his shortcomings may have been key to his victory this past November.

Editorial: Dialogue without pressures

Editorial: Dialogue without pressures

We wish that the dialogue between the United States and Cuba may continue until relations are fully normalized. But if the temptation might arise to reverse or freeze the achievements of both parties in the latest negotiations, and if economic pressures are enforced with bolder and more dangerous steps, the U.S. should know that Cuba will go ahead with its changes and rely on the “shame” of its people.

There’s still the Adjustment Act…

There’s still the Adjustment Act…

A long interview held last summer with Miami immigration attorney Ira Kurzban offers insight into the confusion over the Cuban Adjustment Act and the wet-foot-dry-foot policy. He explained that the United States has a long history with these programs and that the Cuban Adjustment Act was not the only one of its kind.

Obama’s farewell to Cuba

Obama’s farewell to Cuba

It seems that President Obama has concluded his policy of reforms in relations with Cuba with the acceptance of a new migratory accord that eliminates the dry-foot-wet-foot policy, and the Parole Program for Cuban doctors who collaborate in third countries.

Fair decision or foul concession? The 2 Heralds differ.

Fair decision or foul concession? The 2 Heralds differ.

As so often before, Miami’s two Heralds are putting different spins on the news that President Obama has called an end to the wet-foot-dry-foot policy maintained by the United States toward Cuba since 1995. The English-language Herald accepting it almost ruefully and the Spanish-language Nuevo decrying it loudly.

Ira Kurzban: ‘The wet foot dry foot policy … was not a positive policy’

Ira Kurzban: ‘The wet foot dry foot policy … was not a positive policy’

The elimination of the policy may, or may not, have any effect on current practice. If it suggests that a person out in the coastal waters of the U.S. may claim asylum then it represents a change in policy consistent with international law.

Progreso Weekly, founded by Francisco G. Aruca, is an independent publication with a progressive view.

Editor: Álvaro Fernández
1602 Alton Road, Suite 28 Miami Beach, FL 33139.
Copyright © 2015 Progreso Weekly, Inc. All Rights Reserved